ADHD Problems And Potential Exist In The Same Space

Day 28: Problems and Potential

samantha-sophia-l4RL-cUDrdI-unsplash.jpg

Problems and potential go hand in hand.

Without one, you can’t have the other.

Without the potential of a mountain to be climbed, there wouldn’t be the problem of how to climb it.

Problems are a beautiful thing. They indicate that you have the vision for something better. Something to be. Something that isn’t currently.

Problems mean you see potential where others see nothing.

You see opportunity for growth and improvement where others may not even be looking.

Problems and potential must coexist in the same space.

When you see a problem as an opportunity rather than as an indicator that you’re broken, you’re on the right path.

Problems are opportunities to improve. Not indicators that something’s gone wrong, or that something’s wrong with you.

Problems aren’t personal until we have thoughts about them. They just are.

Maybe a problem that you struggle with is overcommitting. You have a hard time saying no.

The facts are “I agreed to _____________.”

It only becomes a problem when you have a thought about it.

Thoughts like:

  • I can never say no.

  • I really wish they would stop asking me to help.

  • I do so much for others that I can’t get my own stuff done.

The problem is that you don’t want to agree to something and you did. There is potential there.

Potential to do differently the next time. The first step to move from problem to potential is awareness.

Awareness of why it’s a problem for you in the first place.

If you struggle with saying no, or any other area in life that you consider to be a problem, book a free consultation and let’s see how you can move into the potential of what’s possible. ~Shaun






ADHD: Is Dopamine The Real Problem?

Day 27: The Problem

josh-riemer-OH5BRdggi2w-unsplash.jpg

ADHD…you think the problem is Dopamine…what if it’s not?

Don’t misunderstand me. When it comes to a formal diagnosis of ADHD, Dopamine, Seratonin and Norepinephrine are often involved. (And by the way I am NOT a medical professional. Should you wish to pursue an ADHD diagnosis, you should speak with your primary medical provider.)

But what I’m asking about is the part of ADHD that’s causing you the most pain. The part that’s giving you the most trouble. The symptoms that show up for you and how they make you feel about yourself.

If I were to ask you “why are adhd tendencies a problem for you?” You may say:

  • I just can’t make myself finish what I start.

  • I feel so disorganized.

  • It’s so hard for me to even get started.

  • Before I know it the day is gone.

  • I can’t find what I’m looking for.

  • I work hard and don’t seem to make any progress.

  • I can get so easily distracted or sidetracked.

  • Sometimes I just feel so bad I don’t want to even get out of bed and do anything.

  • I should want to be more involved.

  • I should be better at gettiing things done.

  • I’m horrible at managing my money.

The list goes on and on.

While Dopamine (and the other neurotransmitters) may be a part of what’s causing the problem.

The REAL problem is what you’re doing or not doing because of those neurotransmitters.

The REAL problem is what you’re making ADHD mean about you and your abilities.

The REAL problem is the shame that you feel and the boredom that you’re afraid to feel.

What I know for sure is that some of that, a lot of that, is actually within your control.

Say what?!

Yes, there is a percentage of ability that we all have to manage our brains better if we want to.

We have the capacity to use our brain as a tool instead of allowing it the freedom to work against us.

Come again?

Very often when we don’t manage our minds, whether we have adhd or not, our minds will work against us.

In an effort to keep us safe. This is true if you have adhd as well.

When you learn how to manage your mind effectively, your adhd symptoms will naturally be affected. They can be lessened.

You can experience your AHD in a new and improved way.

Learning to choose the way that you want to think about things will help you to better manage your feelings.

When you are actively managing your feelings, you will directly effect what you are doing (and not doing) in your day to day life.

Not sure? I’d love to jump on a consult with you so you can experience how it works.

ADHD and Feeling Stuck: 3 Reasons Why You're Not Moving Forward

Day 26: Feeling Stuck

When you have #ADHD tendencies your brain can tend to hold you in lock down.  There are some very good, albeit slightly annoying reasons for this.  I’m going to go over 3 of them below.   1) Sensory Overload    2) Safety    3) Black and White Thinking   Let’s take a closer look at each one.  Picture a power circuit board with relay switches running all throughout your house to provide electricity.  Let’s then imagine your home is running at max capacity. Generating electricity for all things. The a/c, the washer and dryer, the appliances, everything is plugged in and buzzing. (Not ideal, but just go with me.)  What would happen if your neighbor decided to then connect their entire house directly to your circuit breaker to power their home?  I’ll tell ya…Snap, Crackle, POP! Your power would go out and the whole switchboard would blow a fuse. It’d hit maximum capacity and overload.  This can happen to our brains.  We have so very much on our minds. All of the thoughts, and the things we need to do and want to do.  We’re bombarded with all types of “noise” day in and day out. Electrical frequencies surround us. We’re almost always “plugged in”, literally! To a phone, an iPad, a computer, a TV…  It can feel very difficult to carve out some time away from it all. Time to reset, recharge.  When we don’t take a step back we can hit “system overload.” It can freeze us in our tracks. We just mentally shut down.  Another reason we can feel stuck is that our brains want to keep us safe.  They are very efficient at sniffing out “danger”.  Back in prehistoric times, we would sense danger and our “life saving brain chemicals” would kick in to help us respond appropriately, and well, save our lives.  Nowadays, our sensors are a bit off. We’re not out in the jungle trying to avoid lions, but rather we’re out in the world trying to avoid the discomfort of failure. Same brain chemicals kick in, so our brain’s response is automatic and unnecessary.  “Save yourself! Hide!” It’s a bit of an overreaction that needs to be managed.  In comes black and white thinking. This tendency will have you believing that something either has to happen one way or another, you will not have the ability to consider all of the options in between.  You’re automatic response sounds something like “if I don’t get this done by tomorrow, it’s over.”  One option. One solution. When often what’s best for you is some unique approach. (Typically not the first method that comes to mind.)  There’s good news here, all 3 of these things are fixable.  You can reset by taking a brisk walk outside or spending an afternoon doing something you love. Disonnect and reconnect with nature.  You can use metacognition (the skill of thinking about what you’re thinking about) to decide if you want to be scared and yet still do the thing that feels hard.  You can step outside of black and white thinking by asking yourself positive questions such as “What would be the most fun way to ______? How can I work on my project and experience some joy today? What’s the most creative way to get this job done? How might I do this if I switched things up a bit?”  Are you someone that gets stuck easily? I’d love to hear what trips you up and keeps you from moving forward on a project? If you’d like to learn more about how coaching can help you get unstuck, book a free consultation below and let’s get you moving towards what it is that you really want.

When you have #ADHD tendencies your brain can tend to hold you in lock down.

There are some very good, albeit slightly annoying reasons for this.

I’m going to go over 3 of them below.

1) Sensory Overload

2) Safety

3) Black and White Thinking

Let’s take a closer look at each one.

Picture a power circuit board with relay switches running all throughout your house to provide electricity.

Let’s then imagine your home is running at max capacity. Generating electricity for all things. The a/c, the washer and dryer, the appliances, everything is plugged in and buzzing. (Not ideal, but just go with me.)

What would happen if your neighbor decided to then connect their entire house directly to your circuit breaker to power their home?

I’ll tell ya…Snap, Crackle, POP! Your power would go out and the whole switchboard would blow a fuse. It’d hit maximum capacity and overload.

This can happen to our brains.

We have so very much on our minds. All of the thoughts, and the things we need to do and want to do.

We’re bombarded with all types of “noise” day in and day out. Electrical frequencies surround us. We’re almost always “plugged in”, literally! To a phone, an iPad, a computer, a TV…

It can feel very difficult to carve out some time away from it all. Time to reset, recharge.

When we don’t take a step back we can hit “system overload.” It can freeze us in our tracks. We just mentally shut down.

Another reason we can feel stuck is that our brains want to keep us safe.

They are very efficient at sniffing out “danger”.

Back in prehistoric times, we would sense danger and our “life saving brain chemicals” would kick in to help us respond appropriately, and well, save our lives.

Nowadays, our sensors are a bit off. We’re not out in the jungle trying to avoid lions, but rather we’re out in the world trying to avoid the discomfort of failure. Same brain chemicals kick in, so our brain’s response is automatic and unnecessary.

“Save yourself! Hide!” It’s a bit of an overreaction that needs to be managed.

In comes black and white thinking. This tendency will have you believing that something either has to happen one way or another, you will not have the ability to consider all of the options in between.

You’re automatic response sounds something like “if I don’t get this done by tomorrow, it’s over.”

One option. One solution. When often what’s best for you is some unique approach. (Typically not the first method that comes to mind.)

There’s good news here, all 3 of these things are fixable.

You can reset by taking a brisk walk outside or spending an afternoon doing something you love. Disonnect and reconnect with nature.

You can use metacognition (the skill of thinking about what you’re thinking about) to decide if you want to be scared and yet still do the thing that feels hard.

You can step outside of black and white thinking by asking yourself positive questions such as “What would be the most fun way to ______? How can I work on my project and experience some joy today? What’s the most creative way to get this job done? How might I do this if I switched things up a bit?”

Are you someone that gets stuck easily? I’d love to hear what trips you up and keeps you from moving forward on a project? If you’d like to learn more about how coaching can help you get unstuck, book a free consultation below and let’s get you moving towards what it is that you really want.